A friend has handed us [a critique of the 1st number of 'Lithographic views of Australia' by Augustus Earle

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Title

A friend has handed us [a critique of the 1st number of 'Lithographic views of Australia' by Augustus Earle

Author

Author not identified

Source

Sydney Monitor (Sydney)

Details

3 November 1826

Publication date

3 November 1826

Type

Publication Review

Language

English

Full text

A FRIEND has handed us the following critique on the first number of Mr Earle’s, “Lithographic views in Australia”. “The apology of Mr Earle attached to the publication deprecates the severity of criticism on a first attempt; at the same time it may not be amiss while we acknowledge some excellencies, to point out such defects as present themselves to the eye – The view of “Sydney Heads”, in point of local accuracy is certainly unexceptionable, but the colouring is evidently defective – George’s Head in the foreground is soft and natural, but the North Head has a sterile harshness – a kind of “Plummet and rule” regularity which this stupendous cliff, though extremely symmetrical does not really possess; the sky does not shew that brilliancy of colouring, which forms the constituent beauties of a landscape – but the whole partakes too much of formality – The second view is more natural, but an unpleasant glare of light pervades it, which the locality of the scene may render unavoidable; still the execution is superior to the first view – Though disposed to give every encouragement to the liberal arts and the cultivation of science and decidedly of opinion that genius should be liberally rewarded, yet we cannot help thinking seven shillings and sixpence is rather too high a price for each view. Were it reduced to a dollar it would in these times be more popular, and in the end from an additional number of subscribers, we are certain it would remunerate the artist more liberally than a higher price. At 7s 6d the views will be too expensive for frugal persons, however great their desire to encourage the arts.”

[Monitor (Sydney), 3 November 1826.]